-Special Effects-

HARDLINE is an Op art font with a groovy, 60s/70s vibe, all geometric forms composed of parallel lines. It was inspired by the 3-letter logo at right, from an envelope my friend Dan gave me. (USU has apparently changed their logo.) This font is really fun when it’s used big and kerned so tightly that the letters overlap, creating cool moiré patterns as in the animation above. I’ve included a number of alternate letterforms in the lowercase positions for greater flexibility. Includes uppercase and alternates, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.  

The GARDEN fonts began with a sans serif, then sprouted and grew! Inspired in part by the early Walt Whitman cover at left. Plant motifs were adapted from a variety of historic sources* and incorporated into bold, wide grotesque letters in three degrees of vegetation: Full, Two-Thirds, and One-Third. Set also includes Empty (without sprouts) for cross-pollination. (Shown in descending lines above.) Each font includes capitals, punctuation, numbers, and international characters. PATTERN SOURCES Pattern Design: An Introduction to the study of formal ornament, Archibald H. Christie Palm from a woven silk fabric. Italian, 13th century. Berlin, p117 Pattern from a… continued

FORTUNA DOT gives your words the effect of being written with tiny lights or beads. This revival of a “lost” analog font was suggested by Bruce Baryla, the bold geometric letterforms were inspired by Paul Renner’s classic Futura®*. The open structure of the font makes it ideal for layering and laser-cutting, available in three weights. Version 1.5 includes an expanded character set, improved spacing and kerning. *Futura® is a registered trademark of Fundicion Tipografica Neufville S.A. The name is used here for reference only; my font was completely redrawn from analog sources. This is NOT a Futura® font.

The FLORENT fonts are bursting with beautiful, floral detail. The four fonts are designed to be used separately or layered together in different colors and combinations. Florent A (green in the animation at right) is bare branches or vines. Florent B (yellow) has white flowers on the branches. Florent C (blue) is the flowers alone, perfect for use alone or as a “fill” with B or D. Florent D (red) has the branches full of light and dark flowers. Florent was inspired by an analog font called “Garland” in Dan X. Solo’s 100 Ornamental Alphabets. I’ve completely redrawn the font,… continued

CARBON COPY is a dot-matrix take on Courier, the invisible classic with roots in typewriter style. Could be used to suggest the effect of screen display or of blurry old carbon paper. Includes 3 weights, plus one font with a full background of dots. Each font includes upper and lower case, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

BLOOPER and BLOOP SCRIPT were created to have the look of letters formed by puddles of shiny liquid.  The general form of each was inspired by a classic font. Blooper takes after Cooper Black (Oswald Cooper, 1921), Bloop Script after Brush Script * (Robert E. Smith, 1942). I also made a solid version of each (without highlights) for use in layering and with effects filters. BLOOPER 2.0 now contains upper and lowercase letters, plus numbers, punctuation, and international characters. BLOOP SCRIPT includes caps, lower case, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.   More information: Although I probably could have just faked… continued

Alfred Hitchock’s The Birds (1963) is one of my favorite films. This font was inspired by its opening titles which were designed by James S. Pollak. Each name appears in a serifless roman font, then is broken up and reassembled by the images of birds flapping past. The letterforms are my own variation on Optima with certain letters altered to match the film’s. The bird shapes are based on my own photos of swarming crows on Thanksgiving 2004. The result doesn’t match the individual film titles, but suggests the entire sequence of breaking letters and passing birds. An interesting contrast… continued

SUNSET is another special effects font, simulating letters sinking into water and making rippled reflections. The basic letterforms are based on an unreleased condensed version of my Bride of the Monster font. It pushes legibility but could be very effective in the right context. Includes caps, lower case, numbers, punctuation, numbers, and international characters. Oops! Sometimes these special effects fonts have letterforms that can be misread. I was honored and embarrassed to see the Photoshop Disaster at left, in which Sunset played a role. Not every font is good for every word or phrase!

SKIDZ was inspired by a sticker in which the letters where superimposed over a tire tread pattern. I’ve created my own tread pattern, subtracting letters based on Max Kaufmann’s classic font Balloon. When you type, the letters align to form an entire tire mark with white letters. The brackets and underscore can be used to create natural-shaped ends and patterned space between words. SKIDZ contains caps, numbers, punctuation, and international characters. But they’re a bit lost in the edge of the tread, so I’ve made a separate font, SKIDZ EXTRA, with an extra line of somewhat sharper tread pattern to… continued

RADIO was inspired by the old logo of NPR, National Public Radio. Obviously, the line pattern suggests broadcasting. The letters are square and of a uniform width, great for short headings, drop caps, and the like. Includes caps, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

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