-Script-

FASHION SCRIPTS are fraternal twins. The letterforms of each were inspired by an example of 1940s department store lettering. FASHION BRUSH has a rough, art brush texture; FASHION MARKER has the smooth line of a Sharpie®. The inspiration was this example of wood type formerly used by Thalheimers department stores. From examples in the collection of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA. According to their information, “The type follows handlettering styles of the 1940s and is unique compared to 20th-century script typefaces in metal.” My Pen Script Monograms were also inspired by this wood type. Each font includes upper and lowercase,… continued

FAMOUS LABEL is another vertical script with the retro-posh feel of a department store logo. Inspired by a style of pen lettering illustrated in Alphabets: Ancient & Modern, compiled by J. B. Russell and published in 1945 by Padell Book Co. A number of letters were altered to make a more consistent and complete font. As seen in the Script Font Identification Guide! Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

ESQUIVEL is a sleek near-script inspired by an older Esquire magazine logo. Working from this December 1968 issue (with Lauren Hutton on the cover) I had only the title and one short heading inside to work from. The title evokes the original source, but pays homage to Juan García Esquivel, the Mexican emigré “multi-threat talent: quirky composer, eccentric arranger, enchanting performer, dashing showman” according to the liner notes (by Irwin Chusid) of Esquivel’s 1995 greatest-hits CD Cabaret Mañana. Works well italicized too. And there’s also the Engraved and Condensed versions too. Each font includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation and… continued

ESPANGLÉS was inspired by the logo of the great, ubiquitous Spanish department store, El Corte Inglés. A fun, bold, and stylish script. (What is it with these department store logos? I love them all: Harrods, Marshall Field, Neiman-Marcus…) Version 1.5 takes advantage of additional research (a receipt) and contains a new A, S (seen above) and assorted punctuation. The previous letters join the other alternates, at right, to offer more choice and better linking. Includes upper and lower case, numbers, punctuation, international characters, and alternates.

EASTER PARADE is one of four vertical script fonts, along with Scarlet Ribbons, Roselyn, and Famous Label. As seen in the Script Font Identification Guide! This one has the most contrast in stroke weight and some crazy swashes. It was inspired by a sample of hand-lettering called simply “Modern Brush Script” in Alphabets: Ancient & Modern, compiled by J. B. Russell and published in 1945 by Padell Book Co. Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

DIRECTORS SCRIPT was inspired by the sort of dramatic hand-drawn script used in 1940s film credits. As seen in classics like Crossfire, Laura, and Gilda, a very sloped cursive (about 45 degrees) is paired with a heavy roman. To approximate the style at left (from Crossfire), you could use Directors Script paired with my National Debt, Impact or similar. Add a drop shadow, and voilà. A second font has capitals that are 50% larger than the regular caps, re-weighted and aligned to harmonize with the lowercase for an even more dramatic look. Includes upper and lower case, numbers, punctuation, and… continued

BLOOPER and BLOOP SCRIPT were created to have the look of letters formed by puddles of shiny liquid.  The general form of each was inspired by a classic font. Blooper takes after Cooper Black (Oswald Cooper, 1921), Bloop Script after Brush Script * (Robert E. Smith, 1942). I also made a solid version of each (without highlights) for use in layering and with effects filters. BLOOPER 2.0 now contains upper and lowercase letters, plus numbers, punctuation, and international characters. BLOOP SCRIPT includes caps, lower case, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.   More information: Although I probably could have just faked… continued

AUTEUR was inspired by the work of Jean Cocteau (1889-1963), the French writer, filmmaker, and artist. At left, he can be seen handwriting the opening titles of his fantastic film Beauty and the Beast (1946) on a blackboard. He also made many drawings and paintings, often including a variation of this expressive, whimsical script. In researching this font, I looked at hundreds of pages of his drawings and letters. There was a range of clarity and character-formation; I’ve patterned this after his more deliberate lettering rather than that of his correspondence; the latter was useful for numbers and other characters…. continued

ALSACE-LORRAINE is an experiment. My idea was to combine aspects of a vertical French script and a German fraktur. For the most part, the top is the German and the bottom is the French. A font “mash-up” before that word was coined. Named for the region from which my father’s father’s family emigrated. Includes caps, lower case, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.  

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