-Script-

SYNCOPATED SCRIPT was loosely inspired by the work of the painter Stuart Davis. His jazzy canvases bridge Cubism and Pop Art, often featuring words, written in this style and others. Davis’s work always seems fresh and inventive to me. After looking at all the reproductions of Davis’s paintings I could find, I used some of his writings and my own intuition to fill out the alphabet. I’ve tried to maintain both the erratic, jumpy quality and the continuous linking. The originals were painted; these feel as if they were cut out of paper. Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation, numbers, several alternates… continued

SCARLET RIBBONS is a fancy, friendly script, inspired by a Speedball lettering book from the 30s by Ross F. George. The original was called simply Vertical Script and needed a lot of work. As seen in the Script Font Identification Guide! Its name comes from an old song (words and music by Jack Segal and Evelyn Danzig), performed by Jo Stafford, Harry Belafonte, Sinéad O’Connor, and many others. This favorite font is part of a series of retro vertical scripts, Easter Parade, Roselyn, and Famous Label. Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

ROSELYN is one of a series of four vertical script fonts, including Scarlet Ribbons, Famous Label and Easter Parade. (As seen in the Script Font Identification Guide!) This one has sharp, pen-like edges, a lighter color, and the most elegance of the three. It’s based on an unnamed style of hand-lettering in Lettering and Alphabets by J. Albert Cavanagh, 1946, reprinted in 1955 by Dover. I’ve named my font after my mother. Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

The REBECCA font was inspired by the distinctive and stylish handwriting of the title character of the classic film. Rebecca (1940) was based on the novel by Daphne du Maurier and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The title character is dead and not even a portrait of her is ever seen. Her handwriting appears several times in the film and is perhaps the thing that most personalizes her. Her large initial R appears embroidered on a number of her possessions, including the pillow in flames at left. Rebecca’s signature, address book, and correspondence all appear in closeups as evidence of her… continued

QUINCE is a brush script with a different attitude. The basic letterforms were inspired by Murray Hill (Emil J. Klumpp, 1956). I’ve completely redrawn the letterforms with a rough “art brush” to produce an expressive, painterly line, rather than a pen line. Could be crayon, lipstick, of graffiti. More “Bratz®” than “Barbie®”. Includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters. Although Linotype says Murray Hill was named for a “small town in New Jersey”, I’m certain it was named for the Manhattan neighborhood of the same name (as was the NJ town.) To me, the original Murray Hill font… continued

PEARLIE is a script font designed to look like a string of graduated pearls. This is the kind of font I wanted a couple years ago for a Debutante Ball; now I’m ready! The basic letter forms were inspired by those of Monotype Script. Links without kerning; looks especially good reversed or with 3-D effects. Includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, international characters, and a few flourishes for the beginnings and ends of words.

NEW ENGLAND was inspired by the handlettered titles of the film The Devil and Daniel Webster(1941). I fell in love with this handsome script; it’s not too fancy, too stylized, or too contrasty, problems I find with too many script fonts The film itself is excellent and the restored version is well worth watching if only for Bernard Herrmann’s score. The unusual opening credits group the names by those “in front of the camera” and “in back of the camera.” Directed by William Dieterle, Art Direction by Van Nest Polglase, Associate Art Direction by Alfred Herman. Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation,… continued

NATIONAL ARCHIVE was inspired by the familiar look of the Declaration of independence. Every school child learns that it was written by Thomas Jefferson, who was actually only one of several who composed the document that began the United States of America. Unknown to most people is the name of Timothy Matlack, the person who most likely took pen and ink to parchment and created the unforgettable visual symbol of our independence. For the complete text and history, please check the National Archives & Records Administration site. The Declaration itself is always worth a fresh read, a timely reminder of… continued

And now with a big  to Idolize! (In the \ position.) KAFFEEHAUS NEON was inspired by the classic script font KAUFMANN®, which was designed by Max Kaufmann in 1936 and remains popular. That font is widely available under its trademarked name or as Coffee, Diner, Diana, and many others. My version is completely redrawn and differs significantly from the original. For my interpretation, I have adapted the basic letterforms to better resemble tubular neon lettering. The ends of characters are all rounded, and there are more open loops. The highlights give it a glassy or metallic shine and a bit… continued

The IMITATION fonts were originally inspired by the hand-lettered titles of the film Imitation of Life, (1959, directed by Douglas Sirk, art-directed by Richard H. Riedel.) In response to requests. I married my lowercase IMITATION ONE to script caps inspired by ImageLine’s “Dance of the Brush” (which in turn appears to be have been inspired by the work of Charles Bluemlein) to produce IMITATION TWO. And now comes IMITATION THREE, with altogether new caps inspired by the titles of another Lana Turner/Universal soap opera Madame X (1966, directed by David Lowell Richm art directed by Alexander Golitzen and George C…. continued

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