-Revivals-

SWIZZLE SCRIPT is my digital interpretation of the classic analog font “Stylescript”, designed by Sol Hess in 1940 for the Lanston Monotype Company. Elegant and low-slung, in the manner of Trafton (designed byHoward Trafton, cast by Bauer, 1933) and Coronet (R. H. Middleton for Ludlow, 1937). But it’s bolder with a thin-thick contrasting stroke and a higher x-height. I worked from a print reference (VGC Alphabet Library, 14th Edition, 1988) and some metal type (left) for certain characters. Thanks, Bill, for the inspiration and research! Includes caps, lowercase, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.  

SOLEMNITY is my digital interpretation of SOLEMNIS, an analog font by Günter Gerhard Lange, 1952. I was unable to find a digital version of this distinctive font, and was eager to work with it. So I drew this one afresh. The name is intended to suggest the original without infringing on any trademarks. This is an uncial (single case) font in which the letterforms favor the capital versions (except d, h, i, k, p, q, y). It has a calligraphic feel, vaguely Hebrew in the squareness of the forms and the weight of the horizontal strokes. Font includes letters &… continued

My version of ROOSEVELT began with a request by Rob Case for the font once used on Aeolian pianos and organs. I drew the letters from analog examples, regularizing and filling out the set. Subsequently another correspondent, Richard Vance, told me the history of the design (at right) and showed me more examples of the original font in action, prompting the revised version which now includes small caps and a more conventional T. (The curvy one is now located at | and \.) If you like this font, please see my Celtic Knot Monograms. According to Rollin Smith’s “The Aeolian… continued

ROBERTA is a digital interpretation of Bob Trogman’s delightful Art Nouveau analog original. This classic font suggests elegance and fun, exoticism and friendliness. Bob’s story: “I originally hand cut this font in 1962. It is based on a Belgian restaurant sign. I named it after my daughter Roberta. Many Mexican food companies used this font, but they didn’t know it was from Europe. Dan Solo was going to digitize it for me, but he retired from the font business last year. Just give me credit for the design and it is all yours to do what you want.” And you… continued

Plumber’s Gothic is my digital interpretation of the font formerly used by 3M to brand its products. According to their excellent corporate history, the “boxy, serifed…decidedly industrial” logo and font were designed by Gerald Stahl & Associates in 1960 and used throughout their product line until the late 1970s. “Unfortunately ‘plumber’s gothic’ no longer accurately reflected the image of the more sophisticated, higher-tech company that 3M had become.” (Thanks, John, for getting me started on this!) Includes upper- and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

The three OBLIQUE TEXT fonts were inspired in part by the font OBLIQ, designed by Ellipsis, 1984, and issued by Letraset. I have taken some liberties with the letterforms, regularizing them somewhat and sharpening corners. My font friend Janet Wilson got me interested in this font when she sent me photocopies of unused rub-down lettering sheets of the Light and Medium; the Bold is my own invention. Each font includes caps, numbers, punctuation, and accented characters.

The MANUCRYPT fonts were inspired by an unusual example of “Olde English” (blackletter) typing. Preserving the original texture, these fonts have a look that’s much more “Haunted House” than “Wedding Announcement.” There are Regular (“Proportional”, the red screen above) and Monospace (“Fixed Width”, blue screen) fonts depending on your mood. Once upon a time, kids, there was the typewriter. It was like a keyboard and printer without a computer in between! That was where the typist came in, striking the keys and printing simulaneously. But you were stuck with one style and size per machine, usually Courier and always of… continued

LONDON BITMAP is a recreation of the classic Apple font London, originally designed by the great Susan Kare. (She also designed the wonderful icons at right, so familiar to us old appleheads.) The city-named fonts (Chicago, etc.) were a big improvement over previous computer typography, although they may now seem a bit quaint. Most have made the transition to scaleable fonts, such as my own L.A. fonts; now you can again enjoy London’s contrast between “Old English” style and bitmap texture. While I was at it, I also made a Harlequin, Cross-stitch and Shaded version; the initials at left show… continued

LE FILM is my digital interpretation of the classic analog Art Deco font of the same name. Le Film (variously known as Film and Initiales Film) was designed by Marcel Jacno and released in 1927 by Deberny & Peignot of Paris. The characters are conceived as a line of three-dimensional forms viewed from the front and slightly to the right. The letters are negative white shapes defined by the background pattern of elliptical black dots and the solid black “sides” of the 3-D letter. Font includes caps, numbers, and limited punctuation. Although I have only found documentation of a single… continued

LAPIS LAZULI is a set of 3 calligraphic fonts. Inspired by a simple, elegant font called “Papyrus” in one of Dan X. Solo’s great font books, but unrelated to the familiar ITC font of the same name. Any additional information would be appreciated. In completely redrawing the font, I’ve regularized and expanded it and added 2 more weights, Demi and Bold. Each font includes caps, lower case, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

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