-Movie-Inspired-

HUMERUS is a spooky/funny font with letters formed of loosely arranged bones, more in the spirit of a Halloween party than real horror. Think of “funny bone”, “rib tickling” and “numbskulls,” all appropriate to the inspiration for this font, the opening credit sequence of Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948, directed by Charles Barton, art directed by Hilyard M. Brown and Bernard Herzbrun, with animated sequences by the great Walter Lantz, who may have had a hand in the credits as well. The Regular font has the bone shapes defined by calligraphic outlines; there’s also a Solid font that can… continued

Playful and offbeat GENERATION B has a late 50s-early 60s vibe that goes from beatnik coffeehouse to rustic beach shack and beyond. It’s basically an all-caps font, with big and small versions of each letter plus some alternates. With a little tweaking, you can create the look of quirky hand-lettering. Inspired by the animated opening titles of the classic live-action Disney film, The Parent Trap (1961), designed by T. Hee, Bill Justice and Xavier Atencio With its irregular alignment, letter shapes and pairs, this kind of lettering could be seen as a descendant of folk sign-painting (see also Bensfolk), of… continued

The GAUMONT fonts are based on the hand-lettered titles of the film The 39 Steps (1935), a Gaumont-British Picture, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The regular and italic both appear in the opening titles. I’ve taken a few liberties, regularizing the characters but preserving the quirkier letterforms and rounding out the font in the same spirit. Each font includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

Like its predecessor, Gaumont, GAINSBOROUGH was inspired by the hand-lettered titles of an Alfred Hitchcock film. The Lady Vanishes (1938) was produced by Gaumont-British, and is identified as “A Gainsborough Picture” in the opening credits. Another quirky sans serif. Includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

FISH OUT OF WATER is the perfect comedy font, inspired by the opening titles of Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot (1959, art direction by Ted Haworth). Loose-shaped large and small caps suggest unpredictable fun. In 3 weights for greater flexibility. The FISH OUT OF WATER fonts include large and small caps, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.   

DIRECTORS SCRIPT was inspired by the sort of dramatic hand-drawn script used in 1940s film credits. As seen in classics like Crossfire, Laura, and Gilda, a very sloped cursive (about 45 degrees) is paired with a heavy roman. To approximate the style at left (from Crossfire), you could use Directors Script paired with my National Debt, Impact or similar. Add a drop shadow, and voilà. A second font has capitals that are 50% larger than the regular caps, re-weighted and aligned to harmonize with the lowercase for an even more dramatic look. Includes upper and lower case, numbers, punctuation, and… continued

The BRIDE OF THE MONSTER fonts were first inspired by the trailer of the classic film Bride of Frankenstein (1935). The handlettered titles strongly resemble Rudolph Koch’s NEULAND, which contains only caps. (The legendary Neuland was originally handcarved in the 1920s by Koch and remains popular under a variety of names.) My first attempts at the lowercase were made using black paper cutouts. For design reference, I also looked at other Koch fonts like Koch Antigua (also called Locarno or Eve) and, especially, Kabel. My lowercase is “married” to Koch’s original creation, hence the name. This font is dedicated to… continued

WILLING RACE is my adaptation of the opening credits of the TV show Will & Grace, originally designed by Number Seventeen. Like those, I’ve mixed large and small caps with roman and italic lowercase, all based on Times Roman. There are alternates of each x-height character for nearly infinite variation. As suggested by Sara, I have added a more accurate (to the show credits) engraved “Modern” style ampersand. BTW, the names in the graphic above were the names projected for 2002 Eastern North Pacific storms. These are all worked out for years in advance with alternating male and female names… continued

Alfred Hitchock’s The Birds (1963) is one of my favorite films. This font was inspired by its opening titles which were designed by James S. Pollak. Each name appears in a serifless roman font, then is broken up and reassembled by the images of birds flapping past. The letterforms are my own variation on Optima with certain letters altered to match the film’s. The bird shapes are based on my own photos of swarming crows on Thanksgiving 2004. The result doesn’t match the individual film titles, but suggests the entire sequence of breaking letters and passing birds. An interesting contrast… continued

SCREWBALL was inspired by the hand-lettered titles of the movie “What’s Up, Doc?,” Madeline Kahn’s first film. I’m offering this font for free, in Madeline’s memory, but ask that you send a contribution ($5 would be really nice) to the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund or National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. THANK YOU! The opening and closing titles (by The Golds West, Inc.) feature whimsical hand lettering. I’ve worked to make the letters link and collide as much as possible, providing these alternates for a more random feel. What’s Up, Doc? (1972) was produced and directed by Peter Bogdanovich, and stars Barbra… continued

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