-Historic Styles-

BANKROLL was inspired by fonts used for 19th-century banknotes, stock certificates, and the like. Completely reimagined and redrawn, BANKROLL combines the Victorian mix of solid construction and decoration that people like about steampunk. In four varieties: Solid, Shaded, Outline and Engraved. If you want this look in an easy-to-use monogram format, check out Tablet Monograms.

Tablet Monograms have a bold and commanding look. Inspired by the kinds of lettering often found on old stock certificates and bank notes, Tablet Monogram come in 6 varieties including Solid, Outline, Shaded, and Shadow. It’s easy to type your own custom monogram using any combination of large and small initials and a choice of decorative elements.

Niche is a unique font with roots in mid-century modern. “Futuristic” with a geometric bent-wire style, Niche finds its place in special projects. Niche was inspired by an example in a book from 1954, “made with a ballpoint pen.” I’ve added lowercase, reimagined the numbers and given it all a crisp, Moderne finish.

Licorice Whip was inspired by an example from a 1920 book: “A most novel alphabet by Mr. G. E. Gustafson, Penman, Inter-State Commercial College, Reading, Pa.” It was once important for a professional to use the pen well, the visual equivalent of elocution. The neat thin-thick strokes show good control of the pen; along with the gaps, a shimmering effect is created, or perhaps the look of twisted ribbon. A full-alphabet companion to Cascade Monograms.

Mineral City was inspired by an example of 19th-century sans serif typography. Around that time, type designers took a cue from sign painters, omitting the finicky serifs and making the strokes more uniform. These early sans serifs fonts were categorized as “grotesques” or “gothics” and this is a particularly awkward one. (Later these would be refined into fonts like Franklin Gothic, and then neo-grotesques like Helvetica.) I’ve added more texture to give it the rustic flavor of crude printing, rough paper, worn surfaces, or even a hand-panted sign.

Capital City is a bold font with an all-American spirit. Inspired by this poster from the 1960s or 70s, Capital City has heavy slab serifs at the bottom but is sans-serif at the top. With superscript small caps.

McKinley is a series of fonts with the bold but graceful style of hand-painted signs, inspired by the titles of several early silent films, including The Great Train Robbery, The Kleptomaniac, and others directed by Edwin S. Porter for Edison Studios. Available in Narrow, Regular, and Wide, with a separate Swash Caps font.

Bootstrap has a rough-hewn Western feel, like letters were made by an old-time blacksmith. The letterforms are bold and simple, with spurs and a rough texture. Bootstrap’s roots are in my Tapeworm font, reimagined for a new old look.

ACE OF CLUBS is a decorative display font with its roots in the 19th century. The unique trefoil or club-shaped terminals give it a certain jolliness, inspired by the former “lollipop” logo of the A&P supermarket chain. Starting with just 2 letters, I expanded it into a complete font with upper- and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and the rest.

The Gilded Age is a set of ornate fonts with decorative details reminiscent of that period, the late 19th century in the US. Tricked out with “mustachio” serifs, spurs, and inlines, the Gilded Age captures the flashy ornamentation the name suggests. The set includes upper- and lowercase, with and without the engraved lines, and a large and small caps version including extra fancy large caps. Gilded Age was inspired by the titles of the film “Casque d’Or” (1952, directed by Jacques Becker). The film is set in La Belle Époque, the French equivalent of the Gilded Age.

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