-Hand-Lettered-

STUPID COW is a rustic font that looks hand painted. It suggests weak sign-painting skills rather than ignorance, as backward letters do. In the right context, the drips might suggest horror, but this a basically a fun font with an urge to communicate, albeit crudely. There are variants of each letter; TyPiNg LiKe ThIs produces a fine, random effect. Includes uppercase with alternates, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

RUDLAND HAND is a calligraphic font, inspired by the work of the British artist and designer Peter Rudland. As explained in his book From Scribble to Script (John De Graff, 1956) Rudland was an advocate of this style of script–italic hand–as a way to improve one’s handwriting. So although it may seem like ornamental calligraphy, Rudland intended that ordinary people would develop this beautiful, flowing, pen lettering. You could use the font as a resource for practicing your own script or, if your handwriting is as hopeless as mine, a convenient substitute. I’ve created two fonts, one with the fancier… continued

ROUGH DRAFT is designed to look like unfinished lettering–it appears that the outlines need to be cleaned up and it’s not filled in completely. Despite its roughness, it has some of the elegance of a technical drawing. Suggested in part by “Layout Gothic” in Dan X. Solo’s “100 Grunge Alphabets” from Dover, and by Greg Smith. Includes uppercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

REPENT was inspired by the work of Jesse Howard (1885-1983), a folk/outsider/naive artist. I first saw his work in Self-Taught Artists of the 20th Century, published as an exhibition catalog by the Museum of American Folk Art. What is striking to me about Howard’s work is the intense effort contained in his paintings-as-rants, and the overall texture of their deliberate lettering. Howard’s work can be seen in the collection of the Kansas City (MO) Art Institute. Jesse Howard’s obsessively lettered paintings and sculptures are the cousins of these signs (left) which appear from time to time nailed to telephone poles… continued

The REBECCA font was inspired by the distinctive and stylish handwriting of the title character of the classic film. Rebecca (1940) was based on the novel by Daphne du Maurier and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The title character is dead and not even a portrait of her is ever seen. Her handwriting appears several times in the film and is perhaps the thing that most personalizes her. Her large initial R appears embroidered on a number of her possessions, including the pillow in flames at left. Rebecca’s signature, address book, and correspondence all appear in closeups as evidence of her… continued

QUINCE is a brush script with a different attitude. The basic letterforms were inspired by Murray Hill (Emil J. Klumpp, 1956). I’ve completely redrawn the letterforms with a rough “art brush” to produce an expressive, painterly line, rather than a pen line. Could be crayon, lipstick, of graffiti. More “Bratz®” than “Barbie®”. Includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters. Although Linotype says Murray Hill was named for a “small town in New Jersey”, I’m certain it was named for the Manhattan neighborhood of the same name (as was the NJ town.) To me, the original Murray Hill font… continued

The characters of PENSTRIPE and PENCILSTRIPE are each composed of bands of 5 parallel lines, suggesting a sketch, weaving, or even a musical staff. Looks great layered in contrasting colors. In three weights and two textures (smooth Pen and rougher Pencil) which are best seen at larger point sizes. These fonts were inspired by the 1940’s pajama ad shown here. Includes uppercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

OHMIGOSH is a series of 12 fonts inspired by the style of classic comic strip lettering. There are 3 widths–1, 2, 3–each with Regular, Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic. The direct inspiration for #3 was the strip Gil Thorp, from the days it was drawn by Frank McLaughlin (a classic frame at left). For a fresh perspective on the state of comic strip art, check out the blog Comic Curmudgeon! It’s given me a reason to laugh at the “funnies” again. Includes caps, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

MARKERMAN is yet another comic-book style font. Can be bolded or italicized effectively. Includes 5 useful cartoon symbols, gleaned from Mort Walker’s Lexicon of Comicana and ABC Etcetera: The Life & Times of the Roman Alphabet by A. & N. Humez. From left to right of the bottom row above: the squean (which might float around a drunken character’s head), the grawlix (a substitute for swearing), the jarn (ditto), a phosphene (for a character who’s “seeing stars”), and the quimp (another swear.) Have @#$%* fun! Version 4.0 includes an expanded character set with more punctuation, caps, numbers, punctuation, and international… continued

MAGIC CARPET is a calligraphic font with a lively, brush-like style, even vaguely exotic. It was inspired by the hand-painted titles (below) of the film Lust for Life (1956), a biography of Vincent Van Gogh, directed by Vincente Minnelli, art directed by Cedric Gibbons, Hans Peter and Preston Ames. Includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

Enter your email address to receive updates about new and featured fonts!

Close