-Deco + Geometric-

RED CIRCLE was inspired by the font formerly used on the Eight O’Clock brand coffees. These brands (which were sold at A&P stores) included Bokar and Red Circle. The smell of fresh ground coffee and this lettering are forever linked in my memory. We no longer have A&P stores here, but they sell the coffee everywhere, now with a new logotype and style. I redrew the letters from vintage examples, such as coin banks. Very strong impression of 1930s art deco; italicized it can take on a science fiction feel (below). Includes caps, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.    … continued

ONION was inspired by an unidentified font included in Art Deco Initials, selected and arranged by Carol Belanger Grafton [Dover, 1991; “selected from rare periodicals (mostly European), type catalogs and printed ephemera ofthe 20s and 30s.”] Completely redrawn, the onion-like cross-section is simplified, the shapes regularized, and the character set expanded. Lends itself to overlapping, suggests the Op Art paintings of Bridget Riley and others. Includes caps, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

MILKY WAY was inspired by an Art Deco alphabet seen in late 1930s Speedball lettering books by Ross F. George. A “future past” look, like the 1939 Worlds Fair and Tomorrowland. Originally, George directed that the distinctive white dots were to be made by spattering white ink with a toothbrush. The degree of detail in the Regular version of this font means it should be used fairly big, and that it’s a big file. At Jeff Levine’s insistence, I’ve added a second font without the stars but retaining the rings. Both fonts include caps and lowercase, plus numbers, punctuation, and… continued

METRO-DF was inspired by a trip to Mexico City. The official signage of the Mexico City subway uses a peculiar adaptation of the classic font Eurostile, designed by Aldo Novarese. The capital E was most unusual. The overall feel was of a past vision of the future, with a distinctively Mexican touch. (The squared circle, or rounded square, is very common in both old and new Mexican design. I began with a ripoff version of Eurostile (also known as Microgramma), adjusted it to the proper width and weight, then drew the observed characters as well as a few other variants… continued

LE FILM is my digital interpretation of the classic analog Art Deco font of the same name. Le Film (variously known as Film and Initiales Film) was designed by Marcel Jacno and released in 1927 by Deberny & Peignot of Paris. The characters are conceived as a line of three-dimensional forms viewed from the front and slightly to the right. The letters are negative white shapes defined by the background pattern of elliptical black dots and the solid black “sides” of the 3-D letter. Font includes caps, numbers, and limited punctuation. Although I have only found documentation of a single… continued

The HONEST JOHN’S fonts are based on the old logo of the Howard Johnson’s restaurant chain. For missing letters, I consulted similar Deco fonts. There’s a solid Regular and outline Shadow version. Includes large and small caps, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

HARDLINE is an Op art font with a groovy, 60s/70s vibe, all geometric forms composed of parallel lines. It was inspired by the 3-letter logo at right, from an envelope my friend Dan gave me. (USU has apparently changed their logo.) This font is really fun when it’s used big and kerned so tightly that the letters overlap, creating cool moiré patterns as in the animation above. I’ve included a number of alternate letterforms in the lowercase positions for greater flexibility. Includes uppercase and alternates, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.  

The GOYA fonts (including light, medium, heavy, ultra, and inline)were inspired by the logo of the GOYA® food products company. Another Art Deco font–like Red Circle–but this time with a preference for the circle over the square. GOYA 2.0 now includes small caps in the lowercase positions of each font (not just re-scaled but also re-weighted) plus a whole new font GOYA INLINE. Goya in use, by Alter  

Like its predecessor, Gaumont, GAINSBOROUGH was inspired by the hand-lettered titles of an Alfred Hitchcock film. The Lady Vanishes (1938) was produced by Gaumont-British, and is identified as “A Gainsborough Picture” in the opening credits. Another quirky sans serif. Includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

EGYPTIAN REVIVAL is an exotic retro font with geometric flourishes. It was inspired by the single word EGYPT on an old book, sketched at left. It’s named for a style of European decorative arts that uses Egyptian motifs. I imagined I was an early 20th-century designer, influenced by Art Deco and the discovery of King Tut’s tomb. There are regular and inline versions, each including some alternate letterforms. I made this sketch from the cover of a book of 19th-century photographs in the Dallas Museum of Art. Includes caps and some alternates, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

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