-Distressed + Rustic-

Mineral City was inspired by an example of 19th-century sans serif typography. Around that time, type designers took a cue from sign painters, omitting the finicky serifs and making the strokes more uniform. These early sans serifs fonts were categorized as “grotesques” or “gothics” and this is a particularly awkward one. (Later these would be refined into fonts like Franklin Gothic, and then neo-grotesques like Helvetica.) I’ve added more texture to give it the rustic flavor of crude printing, rough paper, worn surfaces, or even a hand-panted sign.

Trails End began as a bold slab-serif font. To that, I’ve added a rough edge and grainy texture producing a unique rustic style. Trails End suggests crude letterpress printing on rough paper, a weathered sign, or a well-worn T-shirt.

STAGE LEFT was inspired by the iconic poster for the movie version of “West Side Story.” Designed by Joe Caroff—not Saul Bass as is often stated—the poster suggests a gritty but playful urban energy. It’s basically large and small caps but I’ve designed it so the big T, L, and F interlock with other small letters.And it comes in three finishes: Solid, Stencil, and Stressed, the latter most resembling the original.

The Stone Proof fonts are weathered and worn, suggesting primitive typeset, rough paper, and aged surfaces. The set includes Regular, 3-D, and a special Fill font to work with the 3-D. Its cousin, Handbill, has the jumbled style of rubber stamps, if you prefer that. A stone proof is a simple proof made without a press, using a mallet and composing stone. Thanks, Vista Bill, for the name suggestion!

Bootstrap has a rough-hewn Western feel, like letters were made by an old-time blacksmith. The letterforms are bold and simple, with spurs and a rough texture. Bootstrap’s roots are in my Tapeworm font, reimagined for a new old look.

Old New England is a bold and stylish script font with a speckled texture reminiscent of a well-worn T-shirt or salvaged sign, comfortably worn. It’s a companion to New England, the lighter and smoother original.

HANGOVER SQUARE is a set of 3 fonts with an early-1960s style. They were inspired by the handlettered titles of the 1964 mad-ventriloquist thriller Devil Doll, set in London as it was beginning to swing. The Regular font is a smooth sans serif with offbeat details. Hangover Square Stones has the same distinctive letterforms, with a rocky edge suggestive of horror or decay. Hangover Square Sticks is a condensed version, composed of rough vertical lines with a hand-drawn feel. Each font lends itself to all-caps or mixed-case usage.

XOXO was inspired by a shopping bag I picked up in Tlaquepaque, México. The quirky lettering and imperfect printing on plastic were irresistible. With two versions of each letter for a more random feel as you can see in “XOXO” in the image on this page. XOXO is, of course, the way you type “hugs and kisses.” But if you prefer, you can pretend it’s an exotic word and pronounce it “sho-sho.” Includes uppercase, punctuation, numbers, and international characters.

The SONNET fonts were inspired by Shakespeare’s Sonnets as published by Thomas Thorpe, 1609, just 400 years ago. Working from a facsimile edition, I selected the clearest examples of each character while preserving the overall texture of the original printing. A good alternative to the overused Caslon Antique. The graceful italics appear only occasionally in the Sonnets, usually to embellish a proper name. To complete the Italic and Swash Caps fonts, I studied a facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare’s plays, published by Edward Blount and William & Isaac Jaggard, 1623. Complete set includes 5 fonts: Regular, with lining… continued

SALMAGUNDI is a quirky font, a tasty melange of various typestyles, tossed together for homemade flavor. SALMAGUNDI was inspired by the sign on the left, on the bus line between Oakland and Berkeley. After staring at it every day, intrigued by the earnest signmaker’s combination of various fonts and his own imagination, I had to get a picture of it and later expand it to a full font. The Regular is very clean. I’ve also made Chewy and Crispy varieties for those who like some texture. I should have named this after a Mexican dish, but they’d all been used… continued

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