-Dimensional-

The Stone Proof fonts are weathered and worn, suggesting primitive typeset, rough paper, and aged surfaces. The set includes Regular, 3-D, and a special Fill font to work with the 3-D. Its cousin, Handbill, has the jumbled style of rubber stamps, if you prefer that. A stone proof is a simple proof made without a press, using a mallet and composing stone. Thanks, Vista Bill, for the name suggestion!

Golden Spike is a unique font that combines the bold serifs of a Western woodtype with dramatic wedge shapes for an exotic texture. Golden Spike was inspired by this tiny image of unknown origin, sent to me by Vista Bill. Also available in “Deep,” a three-dimensional version.

Sleek and stylish, with contemporary curves, SIRENA was inspired by the hand-lettered opening titles of the film I Married a Witch (1942, art directed by Hans Dreier and Ernst Fegté, starring iconic screen siren Veronica Lake. I’ve expanded the font to include lowercase, small caps and, for my own amusement, 3-D shadow versions. Each font includes upper and lower case, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

ROBERTA is a digital interpretation of Bob Trogman’s delightful Art Nouveau analog original. This classic font suggests elegance and fun, exoticism and friendliness. Bob’s story: “I originally hand cut this font in 1962. It is based on a Belgian restaurant sign. I named it after my daughter Roberta. Many Mexican food companies used this font, but they didn’t know it was from Europe. Dan Solo was going to digitize it for me, but he retired from the font business last year. Just give me credit for the design and it is all yours to do what you want.” And you… continued

The five PROJECT fonts were inspired by the hand-lettered titles of the film Project Moon Base (1953). Tucker brought them to my attention with a couple of very clean stills. I only knew the film from a grainy tape of when they lampooned it on Mystery Science Theater 3000. It’s my favorite kind of scifi: laughably dated, fake, and earnest. (Also used in Crash of Moons.) I’ve made a set of five fonts–Light, Medium, Bold, Bold Inline, and 3000 (the 3-D style)–for a variety of uses. Out of the Moon Base context, it can have a very diferent feel, almost… continued

OAKTAG is a set of 6 unique stencil fonts, inspired by the one-character logo of England’s Channel Four. Originally called “Stencil Four”. For the regular font, I applied the same constructed style to all the characters, using a bold, condensed version of the classic font Clarendon as a reference. Channel Four has updated their logo to a 3-D style (left); now I’ve added 4 fonts to the set (and improved the appearance of the original two fonts). Mix, match and layer them! Each font includes caps, numbers, punctuation, and international characters. Oak-tag is the stiff paper that stencils and manila… continued

NATIONAL DEBT is the all-new, 2-font version of my “Savings Bond” font, first released in 1998. It was originally created for a 1940s-style event when I couldn’t find the font I imagined. (Later I discovered the existing font I’d wanted is called Futura Display, Function Display, Gumshoe, etc.) But my version was independently created and now has a distinctive highlighted companion font. Each font includes upper and lowercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters. Another one of Dennis’ Font Play creations.

LE FILM is my digital interpretation of the classic analog Art Deco font of the same name. Le Film (variously known as Film and Initiales Film) was designed by Marcel Jacno and released in 1927 by Deberny & Peignot of Paris. The characters are conceived as a line of three-dimensional forms viewed from the front and slightly to the right. The letters are negative white shapes defined by the background pattern of elliptical black dots and the solid black “sides” of the 3-D letter. Font includes caps, numbers, and limited punctuation. Although I have only found documentation of a single… continued

KARTA was inspired by the 2-letter logo of the Johnston Paper company (below. I was stopped behind their delivery truck and quickly jotted it down.) Looks like folded paper or a paper construction. The set includes Regular and Bold which are outlines of the planes, and Solid which can be used separately or layered to create a color fill. Includes uppercase, numbers, punctuation, and international characters.

JIM DANDY is my interpretation of a font that originated in the 1850’s as Gothic Shade from the Dickinson Type Foundry. It boldly suggests a political broadside, a circus poster, or a Western sign. Later this font would be known as Tombstone and Jim Crow as it was subsequently issued by other foundries in other formats. Jeff Levine jogged my memory with a scan of this gem from a 1970s dry-transfer catalog; thanks, Jeff. The Regular font is equivalent to the original. I’ve also created component fonts for the shading, shadows, and other elements that can be used separately or… continued

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